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ASSET RECOVERY – The act, instance, process, or duration of recovering something of value.

AVIATION SECURITY
– Any security in regards the operation of aircraft.

C.I.S. provides in-flight security from hangar-to-hangar, also; on the ground security at airports, airport business offices, and maintenance offices. Our investigators conduct various types of aviation-related investigation, including background searches, embezzlement, theft, fraud, and sabotage.

BACKGROUND INVESTIGATIONS
– Investigating the criminal, professional, educational, and sometimes personal background of a subject, often prior to or during employment.

CELEBRITY STALKING – The act or crime of willfully and repeatedly following or harassing a person, usually an entertainer, in circumstances that would cause a reasonable person to fear injury or death esp. because of express or implied threats.

COURT ESCORTS –Provision of armed or unarmed security to and from a court of law, often during times of testimony or case conflict.

COMPLIANCE AGENT– A natural person who is the owner of, or employed by, a licensed private security services business. The compliance agent shall assure the compliance of the private security service business with all applicable requirements.

COVERT / OVERT SECURITY Any security given to a client that is known to the public, or unknown to the public. Uniformed Security Agents would be an example of overt security, while a plain clothed Security Agent would be an example of covert security. The same can be said for electronic security that can be detected by the untrained eye (overt), and electronic security that can not be detected (covert).

CRISIS MANAGEMENT – Assessment, planning , and implementation of security and risk analysis related plans before, during or after a threat arises to people, property or things.

Crises are extreme events that cause significant disruption and put lives and property at risk - situations distinct from ‘business as usual.” These would include civilian and judicial crises management, e.g., natural and man-made disasters including such threats as the use of weapons of mass destruction by terrorists (nuclear and biomedical and chemical attacks). The essential nature of crises response in all these cases is not dissimilar. And it is this “similarity” in need for advanced computing, communications and information technology that mark Capital International Security as unique. C.I.S. supports the generic and common use of such research and technologies across all sectors of society. Each sector regardless of size or scale has common crisis management needs. Many of the requirements established by the urgent, disruptive nature of any crises and the research opportunities identified are generally applicable to all crisis.

As used by C.I.S.“Crisis Management” encompasses activities ranging from the immediate response to mitigation and preparedness efforts that are aimed at reducing the impact of future events and take place over a longer time period. The following four commonly described phases of crisis management are referred to throughout this proposal:

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 “Crisis Response” is dedicated to the immediate protection of life and property. It requires urgent action and the coordinated application of resources, facilities, and efforts beyond those regularly available to handle routine problems. The response phase includes action taken before the actual crisis event (e.g., when a hurricane warning or threat is received), in response to the immediate impact of a crisis, and as sustained effort during the course of the emergency. Actions taken during the buildup of a crisis situation are designed to increase an organization’s ability to respond effectively and might include briefing government officials, reviewing plans, preparing information for release to the public, updating lists of resources, and testing warning and communications systems. Pre-impact warning systems may be activated, resources mobilized, emergency operations centers activated, emergency instructions issued to the public and evacuation begun. The emphasis is on saving lives, controlling the situation, and minimizing the effects of the disaster. Crisis response includes the logistics of getting medical care, food, water, shelter, and rescue teams to the scene. Regional, state, and federal resources may be provided to assist with helping those affected and reducing secondary damage, and response support facilities may be established.

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 “Recovery” encompasses both short-term activity intended to return vital life-support systems to operation and longer-term activities designed to return infrastructure systems to pre-disaster conditions. This process is much slower than response, involves administrative work, and is subject to regulations of many kinds (e.g., building codes). Much of this work takes place in an office and requires an appropriate set of tools and supporting network (voice and data) capabilities.

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 “Mitigation”, now recognized as the foundation of successful crisis management, is the ongoing effort to reduce the impact of disasters on people and property. Mitigation includes steps such as keeping homes from being constructed in known floodplains, proper engineering of bridges to withstand earthquakes, strengthening crisis service facilities such as fire stations and hospitals, and establishing effective building codes to protect property from hurricanes.

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 “Preparedness” covers a range of activities taken in advance of a crisis. It includes day-to-day training and exercises as part of increased readiness, as well as development and revision of plans to guide crisis response and to increase available resources. Preparedness is enhanced by training crisis responders who may be called into action in the event of an emergency Information technology contributes to a variety of preparedness efforts. For instance, the software tool HAZUS, a product developed by the National Institute for Building Sciences in cooperation with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), simulates a postulated earthquake and provides a map-based analysis of casualties, infrastructure and building damage, and dollar losses expected. Another dimension of preparedness is the development, improvement, and testing of information and communications resources required for all phases of crisis management. Systems for remote sensing are identified and developed, and the use of information Technology tools is practiced, including how to integrate the multiple information resources that are likely to be needed in a crisis.


DIVORCE INVESTIGATIONS – the dissolution of a valid marriage granted esp. on specified statutory grounds (as adultery) arising after the marriage.
Note: The most common grounds for divorce are absence from the marital home, drug or alcohol addiction, adultery, cruelty, conviction of a crime, desertion, insanity, and nonsupport.

C.I.S. Private Investigators are specialists in information gathering. Their work in covert / overt investigations regarding CIVIL cases is Confidential, Discreet, and Professional. Whether recovering stolen assets, putting together a threat assessment, risk analysis report, travel advice and report, or putting together a case for a personal injury investigation, worker’s compensation investigation, or divorce / custody case, C.I.S. Private Investigators are there to collect, record, and testify for you, the client.

DEPARTMENT OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE SERVICES (D.C.J.S.)
– The regulatory agency of the state regarding the private security industry.

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE– Violence committed by one family or household member against another.

FINANCIAL FRAUD – Any act, expression, omission, or concealment calculated to deceive another to his or her disadvantage. A misrepresentation or concealment with reference to some fact material to a transaction that is made with knowledge of its falsity or in reckless disregard of its truth or falsity and with the intent to deceive another and that is reasonably relied on by the other who is injured thereby.

C.I.S. private investigators, forensic accounting specialists, and or special response team can work with an individual, company, or government entity in the gathering, disseminating, and prosecution of financial or accounting fraud by outside parties, employees, or executives.

HOTEL SECURITY
– Any security regarding the operation of a hotel, or hotels.

INTERNATIONAL PROTECTION
– Any security protection given a client when outside the borders of their own home country.

LEGAL RESEARCH & INFORMATION – The gathering, reading, and disseminating of information pertaining to law.

KIDNAP - To seize and confine, or carry away by force or fraud, and often with a demand for ransom.

MARITIME SECURITY– Protection of personnel or property related to water-based travel, marine assets, or maritime-related security assessment, planning and implementation.

All people above a certain age remember where they were when they heard that President Kennedy had been assassinated. In years to come people will likewise compare notes about how they first heard of the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center.

11 September 2001 changed the international political agenda. Heightened diplomatic tension has given rise to new strategic alliances in the fight against terrorism. In the United States Homeland Security has become a top priority.

The shipping industry is in no way immune from this activity, and maritime security has taken its place alongside maritime safety and environmental protection at the head of the IMO work programme. Shipping may have played no part in the atrocities of 11 September, but it cannot be denied that a ship could have a central role in a determined terrorist attack, whether to transport weapons of destruction or to act as a weapon itself.

In the immediate aftermath of the attacks ICS produced Guidance for Ship owners, Ship Operators and Masters on the Protection of Ships from Terrorism and Sabotage. This advice, which was well received by both the industry and administrations, was also submitted to IMO in preparation for a rapidly convened and US funded meeting of an Intersessional Working Group on Ship Security in February 2002.

The initiative for inter-governmental action has inevitably come principally from the United States, with most other nations broadly sympathetic to their objectives. ICS has likewise made it clear that it fully supports the need for the shipping industry to contribute to the security of ships and seafarers.

The Intersessional Working Group addressed a series of United States proposals aimed principally at incorporating enhanced security measures into an amended Chapter XI of the SOLAS Convention. Some of these proposals, such as the development of ship and port security plans and the designation of company, ship and port security officers, seem a natural and reasonable reaction to today’s changed circumstances. ICS has made proposals on the outline of an approved ship security plan and also, together with the International Association of Ports and Harbors, on the development of port security plans.

Other proposals, including the accelerated fitting of automatic identification systems (AIS), raise practical issues which need to be carefully addressed. Ship recognition is of course important in the context of maritime security, but there must be some doubt whether the equipment can be manufactured and installed on the entire international fleet by the suggested date of 2004. The related proposition to extend the range of AIS so that ships can be "spotted" far out at sea also raises questions and has been passed to the IMO experts for further study.

More sensitive, perhaps, is the debate about seafarers’ identification. Ships trade internationally, and by definition most seafarers will therefore be "foreign". But seafarers are no more likely to be terrorists than any other group of people, and both ship owners and unions have strongly rejected the implication that seafarers are somehow guilty until proved innocent. In the same way, most administrations have rejected the call for background checks on seafarers, aware of the conflict with human rights and the privacy of the individual.

On the other hand, a ship clearly can present a security threat, however theoretical, and seafarers coming ashore for leave or crew changes have access to potentially sensitive areas. So the industry has welcomed efforts to develop a better international understanding on seafarers’ identification requirements and is supporting the intention of the International Labour Organization to revise ILO Convention 108 on the subject, the industry input on this issue being coordinated by ISF. Ship owners have stressed the need for a balance between ensuring the positive identification of a seafarer and allowing him or her the opportunity for shore leave and the freedom to join or leave a ship. Furthermore, personal identification is not just an issue affecting seafarers. Perhaps the biggest single contributor to the security of ships themselves would be a rigorously applied rule that all persons requiring access to a vessel in port carry recognized identity documents.

Undoubtedly the most difficult aspect of maritime security to address effectively is the security of containers, which are routinely packed and Customs-sealed far inland. Documentation is not always promptly received, and the sheer volume of containers traveling the world at any moment makes physical inspection of more than a small minority quite impossible without disrupting maritime commerce in a way which would be unacceptable to governments and consumers alike. Improved information, not least between Customs authorities, must be the principal instrument for tackling this question, so that containers can be selected for inspection in a properly targeted manner. Improved technology also has a part to play, with more effective Customs seals and enhanced probes receiving much attention.
Shipping must not be allowed to become a soft target for terrorism. Ultimately, however, a balance will have to be struck between the potentially conflicting demands of tighter security and the free flow of trade, and this will be an important consideration for governments and industry alike as discussions continue towards a conference in December 2002 to adopt the agreed amendments to SOLAS Chapter XI.

MISSING PERSONS INVESTIGATIONS– Investigations conducted regarding a person, or persons (male or female) who have not been seen or heard from for some amount of time. The report is usually filed because the “missing” person has not followed one or more subjective, or objective actions known to them by family, friends, or co-workers. Phrases like: “I have a gut feeling something is wrong”, “This is not like her”, “I know there is something wrong”, are usually the norm. There may be evidence of a problem, or the report may be purely subjective.

OIL & GAS SECURITY– Security related to personnel within the oil and gas industries, or protection of related assets.

PERSONAL INJURY
- An injury to one's body, mind, or emotions.

C.I.S. conducts personal injury investigations regarding private and public transportation.

PERSONAL PROTECTION – The act of providing close protection, from bodily harm to any specific person, as opposed to general physical security.

PERSONAL PROTECTION SPECIALIST– Any person who specializes and engages in the duties of providing close protection from bodily harm to any person, as opposed to providing general security; i.e., in layman’s terms, a “bodyguard”.

C.I.S Security Agents have the experience of protecting heads of state, corporate heads, movie, T.V., and music celebrities, and private citizens under every conceivable circumstance pertaining to security. Our male / female security agents can operate covertly / overtly depending on the needs, wishes, or circumstances of each individual client.

A few general areas of personal protection C.I.S. can provide for are: crisis management, celebrity stalking, workplace violence, aviation security, maritime security, VIP and executive protection, special response teams, travel security, and children’s security, KPACS, and domestic violence security.

PRIVATE INVESTIGATION – The act obtaining information on (1) crimes or civil wrongs; (2) the location, disposition, or recovery of stolen property; (3) the cause of accidents, fires, damages, or injuries to persons or to property; (4) evidence to be used before any court, board, officer, or investigative committee.

PRIVATE INVESTIGATOR (P.I.)– Any natural person who engages in the business of, or accepts employment to make, investigations to obtain information on (1) crimes or civil wrongs; (2) the location, disposition, or recovery of stolen property; (3) the cause of accidents, fires, damages, or injuries to persons or to property; (4) evidence to be used before any court, board, officer, or investigative committee.

C.I.S. Private Investigators are specialists in information gathering. Their work in covert / overt investigations regarding CIVIL or CRIMINAL cases is Confidential, Discreet, and Professional. Whether recovering stolen assets, putting together a threat assessment, risk analysis report, travel advice and report, or putting together a case for a personal injury investigation, worker’s compensation investigation, or divorce / custody case, C.I.S. Private Investigators are there to collect, record, and testify for you, the client.

PRIVATE INVESTIGATOR INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR (P.I.I.C.)- Any natural person who engages in the business of, or accepts employment to make, investigations to obtain information on (1) crimes or civil wrongs; (2) the location, disposition, or recovery of stolen property; (3) the cause of accidents, fires, damages, or injuries to persons or to property; (4) evidence to be used before any court, board, officer, or investigative committee, who also; meets the regulations, certification, training, and standards of the host state or province, to operate their own business, or enterprise.

PROTECTIVE CHAUFFER
– A fully licensed chauffer, who also carries the credentials needed to be qualified as a security agent.

RISK ANALYSIS REPORTS–Written information usually collected, quantified and provided to the client related to study, planning, and action, in prevention of harm to persons, information, and assets.

C.I.S. can provide up-to-date Risk Analysis Reporting on any country and province in the World. Information is gathered, disseminated, and reported from dozens of sources, both private and government.

SECURITY AGENT (S.A.)– A specific C.I.S. designation for any natural person who engages in the duties of providing close protection from bodily harm to any person.

SECURITY AGENT in CHARGE (S.A.C.) – A specific C.I.S. designation for any natural person who engages in the duties of providing close protection from bodily harm to any person, who is also the supervisor of the security detail.

SECURITY AGENT INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR (S.A.I.C.)
– A specific C.I.S. designation for any natural person who engages in the duties of providing close protection from bodily harm to any person, and also; meets the regulations, training, certification, and standards of the host state or province, to operate their own business, or enterprise.

SECURITY AGENT in CHARGE INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR (S.A.C.I.C.) – A specific C.I.S. designation for any natural person who engages in the duties of providing close protection from bodily harm to any person, who is the supervisor of the detail, and also; meets the regulations, certification, training, and standards of the host state or province, to operate their own business, or enterprise. .

SECURITY GUARD (S.G.)
– Any natural person employed by a private security business to (1) safeguard and protect persons and property or (2) prevent theft, loss, or concealment of any tangible or intangible personal property on the premises contracted to protect.

Guards patrol and inspect property to protect against fire, theft, vandalism, and illegal entry. Their duties vary with the size, type, and location of their employer.

In office buildings, banks, hospitals, and department stores, guards protect records, merchandise, money, and equipment. In department stores, they often work with undercover detectives watching for theft by customers or store employees.

At ports, airports, and railroads, guards protect merchandise being shipped as well as property and equipment. They insure that nothing is stolen while being loaded or unloaded, and watch for fires, prowlers, and trouble among work crews. Sometimes they direct traffic

Guards who work in public buildings, such as museums or art galleries, protect paintings and exhibits. They also answer routine questions from visitors and sometimes guide traffic.

In factories, laboratories, government buildings, data processing centers, and military bases where valuable property or information must be protected, guards check the credentials of persons and vehicles entering and leaving the premises. University, park, or recreation guards perform similar duties and also may issue parking permits and direct traffic.

At social affairs, sports events, conventions, and other public gatherings, guards maintain order, give information, and watch for persons who may cause trouble.

In a large organization, a security officer often is in charge of the guard force; in a small organization, a single worker may be responsible for security. Patrolling usually is done on foot, but if the property is large, guards may make their rounds by car or motor scooter.

As they make their rounds, guards check all doors and windows, see that no unauthorized persons remain after working hours, and insure that fire extinguishers, alarms, sprinkler systems, furnaces, and various electrical and plumbing systems are working properly. They sometimes set thermostats or turn on lights for janitorial workers.

Guards usually are uniformed and often carry a nightstick and gun. They also may carry a flashlight, whistle, two-way radio, and a watch clock--a device that indicates the time at which they reach various checkpoints.

Working Conditions:

Guards work indoors and outdoors patrolling buildings, industrial plants, and grounds. Indoors, they may be stationed at a guard desk to monitor electronic security and surveillance devices or check the credentials of persons entering or leaving the premises. They also may be stationed at gate shelters or may patrol grounds in all weather. Since guards often work alone, no one is nearby to help if an accident or injury occurs. Some large firms, therefore, use a reporting service that enables guards to be in constant contact with a central station outside the plant. If they fail to transmit an expected signal, the central station investigates. Guard work is usually routine, but guards must be constantly alert for threats to themselves and to the property that they are protecting. Guards who work during the day may have a great deal of contact with other employees and members of the public.

Many guards work alone at night; the usual shift lasts 8 hours. Some employers have three shifts where guards rotate to divide daytime, weekend, and holiday work equally. Guards usually eat on the job instead of taking a regular break.

Although guard jobs are found throughout the country, most are located in metropolitan areas.

Training, Other Qualifications, and Advancement

Most employers prefer guards who are high school graduates. Applicants with less than a high school education also can qualify if they pass reading and writing tests and demonstrate competence in following written and oral instructions. Some jobs require a driver's permit. Employers also seek people who have had experience in the military police or in State and local police departments. Most persons who enter guard jobs have prior work experience, although it is usually unrelated. Because of limited formal training requirements and flexible hours, this occupation attracts many persons seeking a second job. For some entrants, retired from military careers or other protective services, guard employment is a second career.

Applicants are expected to have good character references, no police record, good health--especially in hearing and vision--and good personal habits such as neatness and dependability. They should be mentally alert and emotionally stable. Guards must be physically fit to cope with emergencies.
Candidates for guard jobs in the Federal Government must have some experience as a guard and pass a written examination. Armed Forces experience also is an asset. For most Federal guard positions, applicants must qualify in the use of firearms.

The amount of training guards receive varies. Training requirements generally are increasing as modern, highly sophisticated security systems become more commonplace. Many employers give newly hired guards instruction before they start the job and also provide several weeks of on-the-job training. Guards at nuclear power plants may undergo several months of training before being placed on duty under close supervision. Guards may be taught to use firearms, to administer first aid, to operate alarm systems and electronic security equipment, and to spot and deal with security problems. Guards who are authorized to carry firearms may be periodically tested in their use according to State or local laws. Some guards are periodically tested for strength and endurance.

Although guards in small companies receive periodic salary increases, advancement is likely to be limited. However, most large organizations use a military type of ranking that offers advancement in position and salary. Guard experience enables some persons to transfer to police jobs that offer higher pay and greater opportunities for advancement. Guards with some college education may advance to jobs that involve administrative duties or the prevention of espionage and sabotage. A few guards with management skills open their own contract security guard agencies.

Job openings for persons seeking work as guards are expected to be plentiful through the year 2000. High turnover in this large occupation makes it rank among those providing the greatest number of job openings in the entire economy. Many opportunities are expected for persons seeking full-time employment, as well as for those seeking part-time or second jobs at night or on weekends. However, competition is expected for in-house guard positions. Compared to contract security guards, in-house guards enjoy higher earnings and benefits, greater job security, and more advancement potential, and are usually given more training and responsibility.

Employment of guards is expected to grow much faster than the average for all occupations through the year 2000. Increased concern about crime, vandalism and terrorism will heighten the need for security in and around plants, stores, offices, and recreation areas. The level of business investment in increasingly expensive plant and equipment is expected to rise, resulting in growth in the number of guard jobs. Demand for guards will also grow as private security firms increasingly perform duties--such as monitoring crowds at airports and providing security in courts--formerly handled by government police officers and marshals.

Guards employed by industrial security and guard agencies occasionally are laid off when the firm where they work for does not renew its contract with their agency. Most are able to find employment with other agencies, however. Guards employed directly by the firm at which they work are seldom laid off because a plant or factory must still be protected even when economic conditions force it to close temporarily.

Unionized in-house guards tend to earn more than the average. Many guards are represented by the United Plant Guard Workers Of America. Other guards belong to the International Union of Guards or the International Union of Security Officers.

Guards protect property, maintain security, and enforce regulations for entry and conduct in the establishments at which they work. Related security and protective service occupations include: Bailiffs, border guards, correction officers, deputy sheriffs, fish and game wardens, house or store detectives, police officers, and private investigators.

SECURITY GUARD ARMED (S.G.A.) – Any security guard who carries, or has immediate access to a firearm in the performance of his duties.

SECURITY GUARD UNARMED (S.G.U.)
– Any security guard who does not carry, or have immediate access to a firearm in the performance of his duties.

SPECIAL RESPONSE TEAMS– A group, or collection of individuals formed for a selected purpose; the group may not always be formed of individuals with the same occupation, but placed together for their own unique talents, or abilities.

A CIS Special Response Team may be created for criminal, or civil investigations, or for reasons of security involving protection, an attack, workplace violence, a strike, or a multitude of other demands where immediacy is required.

STALKING - The act or crime of willfully and repeatedly following or harassing another person in circumstances that would cause a reasonable person to fear injury or death especially because of express or implied threats.

STRIKE SECURITY – Any security placed, or used in the prevention of acts or violence, sabotage, or other events surrounding a strike.

SURVEILLANCE– Close observation of a person or group, especially one under suspicion.

THREAT ASSESSMENTS
– Investigations, interviews, historical fact gathering, and reporting of security related events surrounding persons, places, or things, with relation to the potential realization of a threat.

TRAVEL PROTECTION– Security related to the protection of an individual, a group, or a thing between any number of places.

C.I.S. can provide full service security for individuals or groups traveling anywhere in the United States or abroad. What do we mean by full service? We can provide travel plans, your choice of vehicle, or vehicles, and security agents for the entire trip. C.I.S. security agents have provided protection from heads of state to laymen.

V.I.P. & EXECUTIVE PROTECTION– A security phrase used for close personal protection related clients often in: entertainment, corporate management, and executive government.

C.I.S Security Agents have the experience of protecting heads of state, corporate heads, movie, T.V., and music celebrities, and private citizens under every conceivable circumstance pertaining to security. Our male / female security agents can operate covertly / overtly depending on the needs, wishes, or circumstances of each individual client.

VENUE SECURITY - Security related to a predetermined site or area usually of a short length of time (less than a week), such as trade shows, parties, sporting events, concerts, social gatherings, stock holders meetings, book signings, etc.

VICTIM ESCORT– Providing safe passage to a person under active threat of harm or to whom harm has been expressly carried out in the past.

WORKERS COMPENSATION– Compensation for injury to an employee arising out of and in the course of employment that is paid to the worker or dependents by an employer whose strict liability for such compensation is established by statute.

Note: Where established by statute, workers' compensation is generally the exclusive remedy for injuries arising from employment, with some exceptions. Workers' compensation statutes commonly include explicit exclusions for injury caused intentionally, by willful misconduct, and by voluntary intoxication from alcohol or illegal drugs.

C.I.S. private investigators record and document evidence pertaining to a worker’s actions while collecting worker’s compensation insurance. This evidence may be gathered by video, and tape recordings, witness interviews, and other tangible evidence.

WORKPLACE VIOLENCE – Violent acts, including physical assaults and threats of assault, directed toward persons at work, or related to the work environment.

Article – “Workplace Violence in America: A Current Challenge to Today’s Private Security Professionals”

Violence in the workplace was epidemic in America before 9/11. Each year employers report 2,000,000 assaults in the workplace (it is estimated that five assaults occur for every one reported); nearly half a million of these are seriously injured; 51,000 are reported raped or otherwise sexually assaulted (it is estimated that ten sexual assaults occur for every one reported); 1,000 are murdered, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Additionally, each day thousands of employees are harassed, intimidated, threatened and verbally abused. Workplace homicide was already the number one killer of women in the workplace and, depending on the interpretation you prefer, number one or two for men and women combined. This, of course, was before 9/11.

Workplace violence, in many ways, "fell through the cracks" prior to 9/11 because safety professionals largely felt it was a security issue and security professionals largely felt it was a safety issue. Both groups took some halting steps toward addressing the problem but both came from very different points of view. It's time to further blur the line between safety and security in this issue. Whether you call it "safety" or "security", the American worker needs to feel protected from violence.

Violence in America is epidemic with over 15,500 homicides reported annually but when adjusted for estimated unreported incidents the estimate may double that. Assaults reported equal 7,560,000 but adjusted for estimated unreported incidents total 37,800,000. Burglary reports are over 2 million annually and when adjusted for estimated unreported incidents exceed 2,500,000. Sexual assaults reported are over 500,000 but when adjusted for estimated unreported incidents the total exceeds 5,000,000.

The American crime clock ticks off one murder every 23.9 minutes, one assault every .83 seconds, one burglary every 13 seconds, and one sexual assault every 6 seconds.

Violence in the American Workplace mirrors the general statistics. More Americans are murdered at work than die at work from any other cause. OSHA reports 1,000 workplace homicides per year and when adjusted for estimated incidents not reported to OSHA exceeds 1,500 per year. Assaults in the workplace are estimated by OSHA at 2 million per year with other estimates as high as 10 million per year. Sexual assaults in the workplace are estimated by OSHA at 51,000 per year with other estimates as high as 500,000 per year.

Estimates of the economic impact of workplace violence range from $70 million to $200 million annually. Workplace violence results in 1,175,100 lost work days annually, $55 million in lost wages annually, lost productivity, legal expenses, property damage, diminished public image, and Increased security costs.

 

 
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